Spring/Break Art Show Price List

Title: Tiger rug
Artist: Taehee Whang
Year: 2017
Medium: Silkscreen on fabric and tarp, aroma diffuser
Dimensions: 11” x 80” x 90”
Price: $3000, edition 1 of 2

Title: Anthropiscine War Machine 2: North American Front
Artist: Son Kit
Year: 2018
Medium: Galvanized steel, vinyl, acrylic transfer, PU fish, RX-78-01[N] Gundam Local Type (North American Type), glass, plastic, air locks, fish hooks, coarse salt, gochugaru (Korean pepper flakes), water
Dimensions: 41” x 37.25” x 31.75”
Price: $2500

Title: Nebraska Suite No. 6: Hail to the Chef
Artist: Kira Nam Greene
Year: 2015
Medium: Watercolor, acrylic, gouache on paper
Dimensions: 44” x 30”
Price: $7500

Title: Spam, Spam, Egg, Spam, Rice and Spam
Artist: Kira Nam Greene
Year: 2016
Medium: Watercolor, gouache, and colored pencil on paper mounted on panel
Dimensions: 45” x 30”
Price: $7500

 Title: Untitled (Broken English) Artist: Tiffany Jaeyeon Shin Year: 2017 Medium: Bisque, tube, motor, Hyangyak Dimensions: 12” x 8” x 8” Price: $1200

Title: Untitled (Broken English)
Artist: Tiffany Jaeyeon Shin
Year: 2017
Medium: Bisque, tube, motor, Hyangyak
Dimensions: 12” x 8” x 8”
Price: $1200

Title: Untitled (Lactic Acid)
Artist: Tiffany Jaeyeon Shin
Year: 2017
Medium: Glass jar, vegetable oil, Hyangyak
Dimensions: 24” X 8” x 8”
Price: $650

Title: Untitled (Self-conditioning)
Artist: Tiffany Jaeyeon Shin
Year: 2017
Medium: Bisque, tube, motor, Hyangyak
Dimensions: Each vase 12” x 8” x 8”
Price: $4000

OUR GREAT LEADER WILL NUKE YOU

Framed as yet another speculation into a post-North Korean nuclear apocalypse, OUR GREAT LEADER WILL NUKE YOU asks specifically after the real and imagined survival of Korean bodies who are subject to the war games and thought exercises of their Western surroundings. The exhibition looks to food and preservation techniques as integral motifs in war, post-war, and future survival, and features work by Kira Nam Greene, Tiffany Jaeyeon Shin, Son Kit, and Taehee Whang.


 
 Title: Judges 16:18 Artist: Jarrett Key Year: 2018 Medium: Perfect bound book Dimensions: 11” x 8.5” Price: $80, edition of 50

Title: Judges 16:18
Artist: Jarrett Key
Year: 2018
Medium: Perfect bound book
Dimensions: 11” x 8.5”
Price: $80, edition of 50

 Title: Cargo Ship II Artist: Jarrett Key Year: 2018 Medium: Oil on gessoed canvas Dimensions: 24” x 20” Price: $2000

Title: Cargo Ship II
Artist: Jarrett Key
Year: 2018
Medium: Oil on gessoed canvas
Dimensions: 24” x 20”
Price: $2000

 Title: Slave Ship IV Artist: Jarrett Key Year: 2018 Medium: Oil on gessoed canvas Dimensions: 24” x 36” Price: $2500

Title: Slave Ship IV
Artist: Jarrett Key
Year: 2018
Medium: Oil on gessoed canvas
Dimensions: 24” x 36”
Price: $2500

Title: COMFORT MARK
Artist: Jarrett Key
Year: 2018
Medium: Plaster, wire, bubblewrap, acrylic paint
Dimensions:  43.5” x 17” x 8”
Price: $2000

  Title: Our Voice (Soundscape) Artist: Jarrett Key Year: 2018 Medium: Digital audio Dimensions: 7min Price: $400, edition of 3


Title: Our Voice (Soundscape)
Artist: Jarrett Key
Year: 2018
Medium: Digital audio
Dimensions: 7min
Price: $400, edition of 3

 Title: Proof Artist: Jon Key Year: 2018 Medium: Perfect bound book Dimensions: 10.75” x 8.25”, 34 pages Price: $80, edition of 50

Title: Proof
Artist: Jon Key
Year: 2018
Medium: Perfect bound book
Dimensions: 10.75” x 8.25”, 34 pages
Price: $80, edition of 50

Title: Cotton & Magnolia (Wallpaper)
Artist: Jon Key
Year: 2016
Medium: Digital print of painting
Dimensions: 24” x 108”
Price: $250/roll, edition of 100

Title: Man in the Violet Suit No.6 (Twins No.1)
Artist: Jon Key
Year: 2017
Medium: Acrylic on paper
Dimensions: 60” x 35”
Price: $5000 SOLD

Title: The Twins in the Violet Suit No.2
Artist: Jon Key
Year: 2018
Medium: Acrylic on paper
Dimensions: 46” x 35”
Price: $3800


Title: The Twins in the Violet Suit No.3
Artist: Jon Key
Year: 2018
Medium: Acrylic on paper
Dimensions: 35” x 52”
Price: $4500 SOLD

Title: Violet Dreamscape No.3 (Twin Lakes)
Artist: Jon Key
Year: 2018
Medium: Acrylic on paper
Dimensions: 25” x 25”
Price: $2500

Title: Violet Dreamscape No.4 (Hudson)
Artist: Jon Key
Year: 2018
Medium: Acrylic on Paper
Dimensions: 25” x 25”
Price: $2500

UNTILL


The two artists in UNTILL, Jarrett Key and Jon Key, are black twins from rural Alabama.
The stories of their ancestors were never recorded in written form. These stories travelled instead as secrets, orally passed down through generations until they became the secrets filling the graves of their kin. The works in UNTILL mark their endeavor to recreate the lost stories of their immediate family as well as those ancestral histories that were consigned to the oblivion of the Middle Passage. They arrive in the past (1619–1953), the present (1954–2018), and the future (a dreamscape) as strangers excavating answers to understand their own history. 

 

UNTILL

Right next door to OUR GREAT LEADER WILL NUKE YOU, is UNTILL, a co-curatorial collaboration between Son Kit and Sharina Gordon. UNTILL features some familiar Codify faces, Jarrett and Jon - “The Key Twins”. Are you ready for your sneak peak?

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UNTILL’s curatorial statement begins,

 Photo by John C. Edmonds

Photo by John C. Edmonds

“I came, I saw, I conquered,” wrote Julius Caesar to the Roman Senate. The Roman people considered him a hero, as much as the Bosporan Kingdom saw him as the stranger come to destroy. But history remembers Caesar’s words more than it remembers the Bosporan Kingdom, and it remembers Caesar’s words because we have his letter. Power in part is the ability to dictate what perspectives are recorded, preserved, and disseminated for perpetuity. The duality of Hero/Stranger necessitates this question then: how does one recover the stories lost to power and conquest?

As you probably know, Jarrett and Jon are twins (!!! WE KNOW. WE ARE SHOOK TOO!) from rural Alabama. Like many black families, the stories of their ancestors were never recorded in written form. The stories travelled instead as secrets, orally passed down through generations until they became the secrets filling the graves of their kin. In UNTILL, Jarrett and Jon mark their endeavor to recreate the lost stories of their immediate family as well as those ancestral histories that were consigned to the oblivion of the Middle Passage. Through their work, they arrive in the past (1619–1953), the present (1954–2018), and the future as strangers excavating answers to understand their own history.

UNTILL marks the first exhibition exclusively featuring work by the Key Twins’. Part family history project, part artistic exploration and discovery, UNTILL dispels the notion of a black monolith, by showing how twins preserve, process and perpetuate their family chronicle in ways that are radically different. Through their own ancestral exploration, the Key Twins offer an account of the common lived experience of young, black, queer folks existing in 2018 America.

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About The Key Twins

Jarrett and Jon a.k.a. “The Key Twins” were born in rural Seale, Alabama. We received our formative education in Providence, RI: Jon attending RISD, and Jarrett at Brown University. Since moving to New York, we have worked individually and collaboratively to cultivate and expand our Queer Black voices. Jon integrates his design & art practice with multi-disciplinary narrative works and installations. Jarrett is a multidisciplinary artist, who investigates the relationship between traditional visual art and performance practices. Our work has been featured in performances, publications, exhibitions, and workshops including Angell Gallery Toronto, 32nd Biennial of Graphic Arts MGLC Ljubljana, Fierman Gallery, MoCADA Museum, The Studio Museum in Harlem, The American Theater Wing/Circle in the Square on Broadway, NYU Tisch, California College of Art, Yale University, Shanghai Theater Academy, and Lebanon American University. Our work and collaborations led to the co-founding of CODIFY ART, a Brooklyn based QTPOC Arts Collective with other artist, dancers, and writers. Our mission is to create, produce, and showcase work that foregrounds the voices of people of color, particularly those of women, and queer people of color.

OUR GREAT LEADER WILL NUKE YOU

First up is Son Kit’s room, OUR GREAT LEADER WILL NUKE YOU. We don’t usually do this but since you’re here, we figured we’d share part of the Kit’s curatorial statement. This is what it feels like to be an insider.

Kit writes, “The Risk of Nuclear War with North Korea,” cautions The New Yorker. “How to Deal With North Korea,” advises The Atlantic. “North Korean despot Kim Jong-un is ‘plotting to nuke Yellowstone super volcano’ and spark eruption that will split US in half,” cries The Sun. The reputability of these individual publications aside, the majority of reporting on the DPRK—whether the close tracking of missile tests or hasty screenshots of Trump’s newest Twitter feud with Kim—constructs an English-language narrative whose plot can only climax in nuclear holocaust.

Expert opinion on the actual possibility of war fluctuates with each new development, but sensationalism profits through steady escalation. Aided in no small part by the impossible personalities of both the U.S. and North Korean leaders, American headlines keep an otherwise footnoted peninsula on the front page for a terrified public.

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OUR GREAT LEADER WILL NUKE YOU is an exhibition of works by diasporic Koreans currently residing in the U.S. Displaced (whether directly or generationally) by a war into a country that does not remember it, the hyphenated Korean experiences estrangement in visibility and invisibility: though they are seen as perpetually foreign yellow bodies, their status as American residents implicates them in American fears. If one Great Leader nukes the U.S., they will die with the U.S. If the other Great Leader retaliates with “fire and fury,” who dies then? Who dies first? Who do they fear for? Where do allegiances originate—from land, from blood, from whoever will spare them in the aftermath?

Kit frames the exhibition as a speculation into a post-North Korean nuclear apocalypse. OUR GREAT LEADER WILL NUKE YOU asks specifically after the real and imagined survival of Korean bodies who are subject to the war games and thought exercises of their Western surroundings, and features work by Kira Nam Greene, Son Kit, Tiffany Jaeyeon Shin, and Taehee Whang.

About the Artists

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TIFFANY JAEYEON SHIN
Tiffany Jaeyeon Shin (b. 1993) is a Korean-Canadian-American artist, curator, educator, and community organizer. Shin explores the interconnections between sexuality, gender, and transgression; history, memory, and cultural myths; and social hierarchy in relationship to coloniality. Shin uses Taoist indigenous knowledge to explore the porousness of bodily boundaries and the ceaseless movement of living processes, like fermentation, echoing the history of colonialism. Shin is interested in entangling the history of conquest and the literal digestion of material - herbs, medicine, and food - into a new system of relations that emerge from a complicated history of entanglement. Shin lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Shin has collaborated with and/or exhibited at Trestle Gallery, Local Project, Abrons Arts Center, Miranda Kuo Gallery, and many others. Shin has exhibted her firtst solo show at the AC Institute. Shin is the recipient of the NARS Emerging Curator 2017 award. Shin works and lives in Brooklyn, NY.

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KIRA NAM GREENE
Kira Nam Greene’s work explores female sexuality, desire and control through lush still-life paintings of food, surrounded by complex patterns and abstract designs. Imbuing the feminist legacies of Pattern and Decoration Movement with transnational/multicultural patterns, Greene creates colorful paintings that are unique combinations of realism and abstraction, employing diverse media such as oil, acrylic, gouache, watercolor and colored pencil. More recently, Greene’s interest in food has expanded into examining ethical aspects of modern food consumption and the proliferation of advertising imagery on our visual culture in a series of paintings of mass produced and brand name food products. In this latest series, Greene combines typical Pop Art tropes with global motifs, subverting the marketing slogans out of context among highly crafted patterns rooted in older cultural traditions. Born in Seoul, Korea, Greene lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. She received her MFA from School of Visual Arts, BFA from San Francisco Art Institute, Ph.D. in Political Science from Stanford University and BA in International Relations from Seoul National University. Greene has shown her work widely at venues such as Accola Griefen Gallery, Jane Lombard Gallery, Kiechel Fine Art, A.I.R. Gallery, Brown University, Salisbury University, Wave Hill, Bronx Museum of Art, Noyes Museum and Sheldon Museum of Art.

 

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TAEHEE WHANG
Taehee Whang is a Korean American interdisciplinary artist and educator who works in video, printmaking, and sculpture. They completed their BFA in Painting from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2016. They collaborated and worked with various institutions such as Eyebeam, Asian Art Archive, Children’s Museum of the Arts (CMANY), Studio REV-, BUFU, RISD Museum, and New York Arts Practicum (NYAP).

 

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SON KIT
First spawned in Los Angeles, CA, Son Kit scored their degrees in Visual Art and Literary Arts at Brown University in Providence, RI. Kit employs climate change fantasy as allegory for displacement and diaspora and utilizes video, illustration, installation, and text to explore non-binary second-gen yellow narratives in pursuit of a New Canon of Korean-American Speculative Fiction Authored Entirely By Them. Kit has most recently exhibited with the New Museum, SPRING/BREAK Art Show, SOHO20, The Naughton Gallery, OUTLET, and Associated Gallery. They are a Co-founder and Chief Curator at Codify Art, a multidisciplinary collective of, and platform for, QTPOC artists.

SPRING BREAK IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER.

Y’all, it’s been a week! On Monday we started load-in for SPRING/BREAK Art Show 2018 (as you may have seen on our Instagram story), on Thursday we closed Hair Paintings and Other Stories… and today we’re putting the final touches on our rooms at SPRING/BREAK Art Show. You read that right, room$$$. Plural. We’ve got two entire rooms this year and we’re so excited to share the work with you this week. We can’t wait to introduce you to our featured artists.

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First, we thought we’d start by talking about SPRING/BREAK Art Show. What is it? Who is it? What’s the deal? SPRING/BREAK Art Show was first produced in 2012 by curators, Andrew Gori and Ambre Kelly who together make up The They Co. Over the last seven years SPRING/BREAK Art Show has become an internationally recognized exhibition platform using underused, atypical and historic New York City exhibition spaces to activate and challenge the traditional cultural landscape of the art market, during Armory Arts Week. In exchange for no-cost exhibition space, visionary perspectives both established and unknown are charged with engaging these areas under a unifying theme and pushed to extend the boundaries of typical market week practices, low overhead and shifting curatorial themes their assets to this end.

 

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This year’s theme is “Stranger Comes to Town.” In their call for submissions, Gori and Kelly proposed, “Even in a land looming with a copper Goddess, one practically begging for the whole world’s Strangers, America’s symbolic territories have consistently mobilized against the Outsider—even, as if obeying vampiric protocol, after inviting them straight in the front door. Yet more than any other country, we are an entire nation of Strangers. This Stranger-ness compounds in its particular foreign associations, but also evaporates under a fairly quick makeover by naturalization, from each territories’ particular Laws of the Land. What is this transformation process—and once you become ‘one of Them’ is there a full moon that can ever turn you back? What the hell alchemy makes us ‘Us’ anyway? And just what kind of Tod Browning-style freak-show of assimilation have we put together here among the accepted and desirable of every part of our world?... A Cultural Trend is also a stranger, new in town. As is Youth, forever evicting the Young before them from the relevancy of trends prior. What becomes Timeless, how does our shit turn gold and when do Golden Years make it gold-er? And what other aspects of everyday life construe the dichotomy of Local/Out-Of-Towner? … SPRING/BREAK Art Show 2018 seeks works about foreignness, migration, assimilation, and the alchemy of two or more dissolving into each other—or story, as the adage suggests—its limitations, arcs, and disassembling in the realm of formal art practice as a further articulation of Them and Us, narrator and audience; two strangers to one another, caught in an exchange.” For a full synopsis of the curatorial statement, visit SPRING/BREAK Art Show’s website!

In response, we got to work on the two proposals that were selected, OUR GREAT LEADER WILL NUKE YOU and UNTILL. Come back tomorrow for more information on each of our rooms and to find out more about the artists that will be featured this year!

 

 

 

Bau Haus Semi-Annual VI: Hello, World!

Bau Haus in collaboration with Codify Art is pleased to present Hello, World!, featuring work by Jarrett Key, Jon Key, Sharina Gordon, Son Kit, and Wael Morcos. This exhibition will be on view for one night only during the opening reception: Saturday, November 11, 7–10PM.

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Hello, World!

@Bau Haus, 516 Bainbridge St. #1L Brooklyn, NY

November 11, 2017

When learning a new programming language, tradition dictates that one begins by writing a “Hello, World!” program. It is a simple script, used to illustrate the basic syntax of the language, and the successful output of “Hello, World!” by the computer marks the first instance of communication between human and machine. 

For writers, artists, or anybody disposed to imagination, world-building contains a similar moment of first contact: one constructs an entrance into a visionary space, and the space offers itself up for introduction. Determining the rules of the world thereafter feels less like an exercise in creation and more an exploratory relationship, in which the roles of architect and adventurer are conflated or confused.

Does one create a world by imagining it? Or does the world precede the imagination, which only allows access to it? In either case, how does one measure agency? 

This question dogs the steps of speculative fiction, so often the venue for playing out scenarios we cannot will into our existence. Is it a concession, a capitulation, to have to escape elsewhere than one’s actual life, one’s physical life, the systems one is born into? Is it, instead, an act of power, where one manifests the world one sees for the rest us to reckon with?

Rather than offering direct answers, the work in Hello, World! is the promised introduction into worlds that engage the questions. In landscapes, soundscapes, artifacts, and ecosystems, Hello, World! examines the ways in which we interpret, navigate, exert control over or are destroyed by the lives we imagine for ourselves.


ABOUT BAU HAUS

BAU HAUS is a live/work project and process space located in Bed-Stuy. Alternately called a studio, an exhibition venue, halfway house, community lab, conceptual incubator, and a great party, Bau Haus is committed to works-in-progress and proofs of concept in the spirit of experimentation, self-exploration, and accessibility. The Bau Haus Semi-Annual Show happens twice a year and features work that has never been shown anywhere else; it is less a culmination of the artists’ work thus far and more an invitation into dialogue regarding works to come. Bau Haus is inhabited and run by Jarrett Key and Son Kit.

The “Bau” in “Bau Haus” is a derivative of “boo” and akin to “darling,” not to be confused with the German school, “Bauhaus.”

 

THRESHELD: final days!

THRESHELD is up for only two more weekends at Underdonk! We at Codify Art were so pleased to be able to curate this group show of wonderful Q/T/W/OC artists. The response thus far has been amazing—whether to the meditative calm of Janaye Brown's video Bather, After Dinner, or the cheeky sensation of the foot massagers in Orlando Estrada's Varied Pleasures, or the surprising greeting of Inhye Lee's motion-sensitive Smile Trio: Who thought of this little song, to name a few. Come by to see the work Sat/Sun until September 10 from 1–6PM, or catch us at our closing event, Friday, September 8, from 7–9PM!

WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART study sessions

On Friday, June 9, 7:30–9PM, Codify Art will be hosting a Study Session at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

So what is a Study Session? From the Whitney's Public Programs:

Study Sessions is a new, ongoing event series inspired by Fred Moten and Stefano Harney’s notion of study as “what you do with other people.” For each Study Session, an artist, writer, or cultural worker selects an artwork on view in the Whitney’s galleries as a departure point for thinking through an urgent question in our contemporary political landscape. Participants are invited to join in open-ended discussions and engage with creative practice. Study Sessions may take the form of workshops, listening parties, performances, readings, or film screenings.

For our Study Session, we will be responding to the Whitney’s newest exhibition, WHERE WE ARE: SELECTIONS FROM THE WHITNEY’S COLLECTION, 1900–1960. 

Where We Are "traces how artists have approached the relationships, institutions, and activities that shape our lives. Drawn entirely from the Whitney’s holdings, the exhibition is organized around five themes: family and community, work, home, the spiritual, and the nation." 

 War Series: Shipping Out by Jacob Lawrence

War Series: Shipping Out by Jacob Lawrence

Codify Art will facilitate a conversation around the themes of Nation and Work with Jacob Lawrence's War Series (1947) and Elizabeth Catlett's I am the Negro woman linocuts as our departure points. Framed as a writing and zine-making workshop, our Study Session examines the work as each artists' effort "to create her or his own vision of American life" and invites you to share your own contemporary reimagining. Bring a pen or pencil!

THE SURVIVAL LIBRARY at The Whitney Study Sessions

ICYMI, Codify Art is working with Pioneer Works' School of the Apocalypse to bring you The Survival Library, a project that:

...aims to consolidate and contribute to an ongoing collection of publications and media works centered around the personal narratives of W/Q/T/POC. We respond to the hostility of American society by amassing the knowledge gained in the course of our individual navigations into a shared archive. The Survival Library does not seek to replicate pre-existing nexuses developed for concrete resistance actions, which are invaluable and already available. Instead, it seeks to create an analogous resource for emotional responses: a confirmation that You Are Not Alone in your experiences, a torch warded against this gaslighting world of “alternative facts.” The [works are] available online and/or in-person—depending on optimal channels of dissemination—as a guerrilla hub of valid, examined feelings.

Physical works from this archive will be on view at our workshop! Be inspired, feel seen, and connect with folks from your community. Our goal for the Study Session is that you leave with the beginnings of a zine that tells your story. We hope that you'll contribute to this ever-growing collection of QTPOC voices and works. See you soon. 

STANDARD STANDARD FEATURE: JARRETT KEY

Last but certainly not least in our SPRING / BREAK Art Show artist feature is our very own Jarrett Key.

Born and raised in Seale, Alabama, Jarrett Key is a multi-disciplinary artist who integrates movement, music, and heightened language in his work. Graduate of Brown University, he is currently the Assistant to the Associate Producer at the Public Theater and has produced, performed, and curated many art pieces and performances during his time in NYC. 

Jarrett's hairpainting series marries performance and visual art through codified movement, tempera paint and a ponytail, straightened with a hot comb. This literal “hairbrush” transcribes the movements and gestures of the embodied tool. Each mark on the canvas is a signature of identity, a relic of performance. Each endeavor is a recorded dance-like performance, with a resulting hairpainting object. 

Hairpainting No 14 is set to a score of Jarrett interviewing family members about his late grandmother. They discussed what was she like, what she wore, her daily rituals. These memories combined with a set of 4-5 choreographed movements birth the full performance. The deliberate use of Black hair - an intensely charged symbol of respectability politics, workplace discrimination, and beauty standards - as the mark-making tool is key in the series. It underscores the personal and political nature of Jarrett's work. 

Stop by 4 Times Sq, Fl 23, Room 24 to see the beautiful and arresting work of Jarrett Key. We'll be there today and tomorrow from 11am - 6pm.

STANDARD STANDARD FEATURE: EMILY OLIVEIRA

As we end the fourth day of our exhibition STANDARD STANDARD at SPRING/BREAK Art Show, this evening’s feature is no other than Emily Oliveira. You have never seen anything like their Labor-In-Vain series, so come to room 2324 on Sunday or Monday, March 5th and 6th!

Labor-In-Vain is a series of embroidered pillows and banners featuring women bodybuilders. The work highlights the connection between the domestic labor of women’s crafts, the invisible labor of outsourced black and brown women textile workers, and the labor of women bodybuilders. The assemblage materials used on the pillows interrupts their utility and rejects the misinterpretation of the handmade as a charming relic of the past. Instead these materials place the act of the handmade in the present and visceral world of global labor and materials culled from dinner scraps. Labor-In-Vain touches upon the ways in which feminized labor is marginalized both when it aligns with the desires of men/the market, and when it directly opposes and seeks to subvert those desires.

Emily is a Brooklyn-based performance artist, sculptor and costume designer. They are a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design and studied performance at Brown University. Outside of their visual art practice, Emily’s performance works include I Am One of Them and So Are You (Brown University), DELILAH (What Is Love? Baby Don’t Hurt Me) (Hot! Festival of Queer Theater at Dixon Place), Everything Happens for a Reason (Judson Memorial Church), So Thick That Everybody Else in the Room is so Uncomfortable (Cloud City), Do You Ever Long for True Love From Me (Judson Memorial Church) and KINGS AND QUEENS OF LOVE (Ars Nova). Their work uses transcribed text, original and popular music, dance, and full-body costumes to subvert the despotism of white femininity and examine narratives about love, sex and race in American popular culture. Their costumes have been shown at The Judson Memorial Church, Invisible Dog, The Center for Performance Research and Theatre for the New City.

Emily’s pieces are such a satisfying complement to the strong QTPOC narratives found in STANDARD STANDARD. 4 Times Sq. Don’t miss out!

STANDARD STANDARD FEATURE: YVES-OLIVIER MANDEREAU

Today we're featuring Yves-Olivier Mandereau from our SPRING / BREAK Art Show exhibition STANDARD STANDARD. We're lucky to have Yves-Olivier in New York for this exhibition, so be sure to swing by room 2324 from 11am-6pm daily through March 6 to say hey!

A native San Franciscan, Yves-Olivier quickly became fascinated by clay's materiality and historical significance. This was seed that later grew into his project "Porncelain," a reappropriation of fine china as a means of confrontation and conversation between tenets of ‘the christian home’ and his queer identity. Yves-Olivier subverts these classic heirlooms and claims them as his own by inserting floral-like images of gay pornography. 


Yves-Olivier purposefully uses ‘found’ chinaware in order to broaden the discussion beyond his own sexuality. He invites the viewer to contemplate homosexuality and its oppressors at the hallowed hearth of Family—the dinner table. Yves-Olivier complicates the traditional narrative of familial inheritance by shining a spotlight on the queer community's absence of a formal transference of material culture. As queer people are often pushed to create their own Chosen Families, the viewer is forced to confront what inheritance looks like outside of a heteronormative structure.  

We're thrilled to have Yves-Olivier's elegant and provoking "Porncelain" pieces in STANDARD STANDARD. We hope to see you at 4 Times Sq soon!

STANDARD STANDARD FEATURE: MARTINE GUTIERREZ

We had a great first day at SPRING / BREAK Art Show! Be sure to check us out at 4 Times Square, Floor 23 in Room #24. We'll be here March 1-6, from 11am-6pm daily. 

Next up in our artist feature is Martine Gutierrez.

Sitting down with Martine was such a pleasure. The conversation about her work began with her name: Martín to Martine.

Hands Up was kind of the first music video. I guess I made a few music videos in high school, but this was kind of the beginning of this pop star persona I started cultivating. And at that time also, my name was spelled Martín—with an accent over the “i,” no “e.” And no one could say that—especially in Vermont in high school—And they would just add the “e,” like a French girl, Martine. That kind of switch of gender, that fluidity of gender… it was such a gift that I really didn’t fully appreciate until college. And then in college I thought I should play with it as this pop star character. So I gave that pop star that name, and it’s funny because now that’s the name I’ve adopted in my real life.
— Martine (edited)
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Interested in the fluidity of relationships and the role of genders within them, Martine offers mannequins in her own stead to explore the diverse narratives of intimacy. Acting as a conduit, Martine supplies a framework that facilitates a dialogue requiring the viewer to question their own perceptions of sex, gender, and social groups.

Hands Up, reflecting old Hollywood glamour, was the first time that she had collaborated with many people. It also features her first unreleased single, which was selected by Saint Laurent Paris for their Cruise Collection 2012 video editorial. Her music has since been featured by several other fashion houses, including Christian Dior and Acne Studios.

Don’t miss a chance to check out Martine’s iconic installation at STANDARD STANDARD.

STANDARD STANDARD FEATURE: JON KEY

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Today is the first official day of SPRING / BREAK Art Show! We'll be featuring the individual artists in our curatorial project STANDARD STANDARD throughout the exhibition. Be sure to check us out at 4 Times Square, Floor 23 in Room #24. We'll be here March 1-6, from 11am-6pm daily. 

First up is Jon(athan) Key. Jon is a Black Artist, Designer, and Writer. Raised in rural Alabama, Jon started visual art and design at an early age. At 10, Jon taught himself HTML and Java Script. Design became a major tool for his artistic expression. It wasn’t until high school that he began to focus on developing a strong traditional art practice. After summers spent at SCAD and RISD in pre-college programs, Jon matriculated to RISD for his formative art years.  

Jon’s work explores the tension and fragmentation of identity. Through collage, installation and painting he creates intimate spaces that recount the experiences of confronting his own queerness, blackness, southerness, and family. He has two pieces from his Man in Violet Suit Series showing at Codify Art’s booth in SPRING/BREAK Art Show. He sold his first painting, Man in the Violet Suit No 3 (Red), during yesterday's press preview! The Man in the Violet Suit series plays on the assumption of self-portraiture. The collaged elements are painted, claiming the verisimilitude of photography in role but embodying the ambiguity of pictorialization in form; the Man, who may or may not be the artist, explores how distance from perception cannot fully negate the gradation between the viewer and the self.

Building upon queerness and blackness as themes in his work, Jon’s installation Cotton and Magnolia focuses on family and southerness. This series forces the viewer to reflect on the past and present burdens of the Black Family in the South. Harkening on bourgeois home aesthetics, the Cotton and Magnolia wallpaper signifies the historical and transgenerational trauma built within the foundation and walls of our society. With a statue cast from his own hands and a collage film based on images created for his zine WE, Jon builds strong narratives that immerse the viewer in a breadth of perspectives and ideas.

We are so proud to have Jon's work as a part of our show STANDARD STANDARD. Check it out, before it’s too late!

 

STANDARD STANDARD at SPRING/BREAK Art Show 2017

Codify Art is thrilled to present STANDARD STANDARD, a new exhibition of work by QTPOC artists at SPRING/BREAK Art Show to coincide with Armory Arts Week in New York City. The sixth edition of SPRING/BREAK Art Show will take place in the former corporate offices located at 4 Times Square, with our curatorial project in room #24 on the 23rd floor of the building. The show will run March 1–6, 2017, from 11AM to 6PM daily, with a VIP Vernissage on Tuesday, February 28 from 5–9PM. Passes can be purchased at springbreakartshow.com.

 "Man in the Violet Suit No. 3 (Red)" by Jon Key

"Man in the Violet Suit No. 3 (Red)" by Jon Key

Between December 2012 and May 2013, Time magazine went from declaring “selfie” one of the Top 10 Buzzwords of the year to lambasting “The Me Me Me Generation” on their front cover. Since then, the battlefield designated by these two poles has been tread flat with skirmishes. Selfie apologists weaponize the language of empowerment and entrepreneurship while detractors raise concerns over inauthenticity and surveillance. What seems to be the crux of both arguments is power: are we are setting the terms for our presentations, or are we simply arming a malicious ether with our likenesses?

The black mirror, or Claude glass, is similarly a tool of power. In its facade, all of nature is distilled and composed for the artist’s gaze. However, consider: who held these mirrors? In the 18th and 19th centuries, who could walk freely through a picturesque landscape? Who had the time and means to decide to paint it? Who was allowed the distance necessary to observe? Now, as we speak of a generation enraptured by our reflections, can we say the glass has passed hands?

As cultural conversations turn to the proliferation of self, the question of whether art should ‘hide the artist’ should not be removed from the question of power. Some artists simply cannot hide. For so long as the black mirror is held by the institution, the marginalized artist remains the subject on view. In the glass, her reflection is diffused—not the sharp specificity of the individual but the simplification of a (skin) tonal range. As Hannah Black writes, “the identity artist has to exemplify a race/gender category, but as soon as she steps into the institution’s embrace, she becomes an example of universality.” What does it mean that entire artistic designations are delineated by the artists’ categorical identities rather than the content, the medium, the form of the works? 

The artist of color (and all its intersections), is familiar with this conflation. There is never an individual; it is always “all of us.” If the artist hides, it is less her decision and more an erasure, a disavowal. For a subject on view, all of choice swings on the fulcrum of identity, and there is no escape from the omnipresent eye.

Martine Gutierrez: “Hands Up”

Interested in the fluidity of relationships and the role of genders within them, Martine Gutierrez offers mannequins in her own stead to explore the diverse narratives of intimacy. Life-size props blur into a discourse about what it means to be ‘genuine,’ where interpretations of dichotomous constructs such as ‘gay’ vs ‘straight,’ or ‘reality’ vs ‘fantasy’ are revealed as subjective and mutable. Acting as a conduit, Martine supplies a framework that facilitates a dialogue requiring the viewer to question their own perceptions of sex, gender, and social groups.

Jarrett Key: “Hair Painting No. 11” and “Hair Painting No. 14” 

Jarrett Key’s Hair Paintings are as personal as they are political, and political because they are personal. Scored with an oral history of Jarrett’s late grandmother, these choreographed performances recount their family’s specific rituals through the use of their black hair—an intensely charged symbol of respectability politics, workplace discrimination, and beauty standards—as the mark-making tool. Though the resulting paintings can exist within a European abstract art historical context, Jarrett’s black body on view carries the weight of their difference, serving to ingratiate or alienate the audience in turn with their history, personhood, pathos, and joy.

Jon Key: “Man in the Violet Suit No. 2(Green)” and “Man in the Violet Suit No. 3 (Red)”

As abstractions of the Queer Black Man, a category whose members already walk society as caricatures, Jon Key's “Man in the Violet Suit” series plays on the assumption of self-portraiture. The subject of the paintings is simultaneously flamboyant and flattened, provocative and subdued. The frame stifles, but the eyes accuse elsewhere. The collaged elements are also painted, claiming the verisimilitude of photography in role but embodying the ambiguity of pictorialization in form; the Man, who may or may not be the artist, explores how distance from perception cannot fully negate the gradation between the viewer and the self. 

Yves-Olivier Mandereau: “Porncelain”

Yves-Olivier Mandereau’s “Porncelain” reappropriates fine china as a means of confrontation between ‘The Christian Home’ and his homosexuality, staged on the most hallowed locus of the family hearth—the dinner table. Yves-Olivier subverts the heirloom, a beacon of traditional values, with gay pornography, a personal utopia in which he had found himself unafraid. “Porncelain” is both cheeky and traumatic, a preemptive strike at ‘The Conversation’ that also raises questions of a legacy for the queer community, which stands as the only classified social grouping without any generational inheritance of material culture.

Emily Oliveira: "Labor-In-Vain"

With “Labor-In-Vain,” Emily Oliveira draws a thread between the domestic labor of women’s crafts, the invisible and outsourced labor of black and brown women textile workers, and the physical labor of women body builders. Their utility interrupted by the assemblage materials, the embroidered pillows reject the notion of the handmade as a relic of the past and instead place themselves in the visceral present of global labor, economic disparity, and food security. “Labor-in-Vain” examines the ways in which feminized labor is marginalized—both when it aligns with the desires of men and market, and when it directly subverts those desires.

The artists in STANDARD STANDARD are not monolith but acknowledge the possibility of being viewed as such. Their work confronts, accepts, or simply exists in their responsibility as it relates to their truths. They fly their own standards, aware to which they will be held.

For more information, please visit springbreakartshow.com or contact kat.jk.lee [at] gmail [dot] com.